8 a.m. July 24 Tamarack Fire Update: Power restored to Topaz Ranch Estates

John Flaherty captured this photo of the Tamarack burning in the Highway 395 corridor on Thursday from Gold Hill above Holbrook Junction.

John Flaherty captured this photo of the Tamarack burning in the Highway 395 corridor on Thursday from Gold Hill above Holbrook Junction.

Power was restored to Topaz Ranch Estates around 11 p.m. Friday but remains out to the Highway 395 corridor.

NVenergy.com reports that there are 288 homes and businesses without power as of 7 a.m. Saturday due to the Tamarack Fire.

While restoration of power depends on the fire, the estimate is 1 p.m. today.

The Tamarack Fire spans 20 miles from its point of origin in the Sierra Nevada near the top of Pleasant Valley Creek to Bald Mountain in the Pine Nuts. The fire is named for Tamarack Lake, which is west of the origin.

First reported as a single tree on Independence Day, the fire grew from a quarter acre on July 10 to 40 acres before it blew up on July 16.

The Alert Wildfire camera on Bald Mountain in the Pine Nuts showed the fire burning less vigorously than over previous nights as the fire moved into lighter fuels and had there was less wind.

The Nevadafireinfo.org showed hot spots reaching south along the state line along ridge on the west side of Highway 395. While those hot spots don’t necessarily equate actual flames, they have predicted which way the Tamarack Fire has historically burned.

The map indicates hot spots all along the southern front of the fire’s Nevada salient, and also on the far south end toward Highway 4.

Officially, the fire is at 59,112 acres, according to Saturday morning’s situation report and containment remains at 4 percent between Highway 89 and the West Fork of the Carson River in Alpine County.

The cost to fight the fire hit $11.1 million with 1,425 firefighters, mostly working in the 31 twenty-member handcrews and 108 engines.

Smoke from the fire sent visibility at Minden-Tahoe Airport down to 4 miles through Saturday morning. Air quality at the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection’s monitor in Ranchos Aspen Park was on the cusp of deteriorating from unhealthy to very unhealthy at 7 a.m.

 




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